Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

The Story: The Threshing Floor

Posted: August 19, 2018 in Uncategorized

already & not yet

At this point in Israel’s history, power is decentralized. Rather than replace Joshua with another national leader, a series of local, tribal leaders emerge throughout the land. But Israel also deals with the repercussions that come from failing to drive the pagan peoples out of the land. In fact, Judges 1:28 says, “When Israel grew strong, they put the Canaanites to forced labor, but did not drive them out completely.” The former slave people are now guilty of the crimes of Pharaoh a few generations earlier.

And it’s precisely this kind of moral drift that characterizes Israel during the period of the judges. Repeatedly, this phrase comes up in Judges: And the people did what was right in their own eyes. Sad commentary on this period of Israel’s history.

And so this cycle begins: Israel does evil in the sight of the Lord; God punishes Israel by allowing…

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With whites now making up less than half of America’s K-12 students, the country’s success or failure in the 21st century will be decided in the classroom.

Two years into a demanding new era for the American education system, its defining 21st century challenge is coming into sharper focus.

That new era began in September 2014, when for the first time, kids of color constituted a majority of America’s K-12 public school students nationwide. That tilt will only deepen: The National Center for Education Statistics projects that by 2025, whites will shrink to 46 percent of public school students. Because this shift is most advanced among the youngest children (kids from minority groups already constitute a majority of Americans younger than five), most high school graduates are still white. But the NCES projects that by 2024 minority kids will represent a majority of high school graduates as well.Read, learn, explore and form your own opinion because Knowledge IS Power! — Click on the link for the full story.

https://www.theatlantic.com/amp/article/483405/?__twitter_impression=true

By Drew Perkins

Achievement sounds great doesn’t it? What parent doesn’t want their child to achieve? What teacher doesn’t hope their students achieve at a high level? Of course achievement in general is a good thing but the Culture of Achievement created by high stakes accountability measures is having a dangerous effect on education.

Read, learn, explore and form your own opinion because Knowledge IS Power!Click on the link below for the full story.

https://www.teachthought.com/learning/how-the-culture-of-achievement-is-hurting-our-schools/

Diane Ravitch's blog

Mayor Rahm Emanuel of Chicago will go down in American history as the mayor who closed 50 public schools one day.

It was a brutal act. It showed his contempt for public education. While he closed public schools, he continued to open privately managed charter schools. Perhaps he hopes one day he hopes a charter school will be named for him, as one is named for billionaire Governor Bruce Rainer and billionaire Penny Pritzker.

But what about the children? Reformers like Emanuel think that closing schools is great for students. He thinks they thrive on disruption. They don’t.

A new study concludes that the children whose schools were closed suffered academic losses. Duh.

Here is the report in The Chicago Reporter.

Mike Klonsky writes about the report and the school closing disaster here.

Mike writes:

The study concludes:

“Closing schools — even poorly performing ones — does not improve…

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Diane Ravitch's blog

This is a powerful article about how schools are responding to the culture of gun violence. Why is this happening? Could it be because we have a Congress and a President whose loyalty has been purchased by the National Rifle Association? Our leaders refuse to enact meaningful control of guns. They send their thoughts and prayers. I’m counting on the younger generation to vote them out of office.

<a href=”https://nyti.ms/2GwHpoy“>This is school in America now.</a>

James Poniewozik, The Chief television critic of the New York Times, wrote it.

“The heartbreaking thing about the images — one heartbreaking thing among many — is the precision. The cooperation. The orderliness.

“Time after time, a report comes of another everyday nightmare at an American school, and with it, a harrowing ritual. We see the children — those who survived — filmed from news helicopters, leaving the building in neat lines. They’re…

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You will never fully understand what true wealth is until you have something in your life that money just cannot buy.

By Lolly Daskal President and CEO, Lead From Within

You don’t have to look hard to find a book or article about how to become wealthy and successful. And many of them have some great ideas.

But it’s important to always remember that the truest wealth is not counted in money but in the things that bring us happiness.

If you want to become really wealthy, here are the best tips I can offer:

1. Build a life of integrity. Integrity means choosing courage over comfort, doing what is right instead of what is easy and practicing your values rather than simply professing them. If you can live by integrity you have will have richness beyond your means.

2. Be rich in character. Value your character and integrity so highly that no one can ever buy it out. Success is always temporary and money is fleeting. When all is said and done, the only thing you will have left is your richness of character.

Click on the link for the full article and enjoy.

https://www.inc.com/lolly-daskal/turns-out-you-dont-need-to-make-money-to-be-wealthy.html

Why American Students Haven’t Gotten Better at Reading in 20 Years … Schools usually focus on teaching comprehension skills instead of general knowledge—even though education researchers know better.

Every two years, education-policy wonks gear up for what has become a time-honored ritual: the release of the Nation’s Report Card. Officially known as the National Assessment of Educational Progress, or NAEP, the data reflect the results of reading and math tests administered to a sample of students across the country. Experts generally consider the tests rigorous and highly reliable—and the scores basically stagnant.

Math scores have been flat since 2009 and reading scores since 1998, with just a third or so of students performing at a level the NAEP defines as “proficient.” Performance gaps between lower-income students and their more affluent peers, among other demographic discrepancies, have remained stubbornly wide.

Read, learn, explore and form your own opinion because … Knowledge IS Power!

Click on the link for the full story.

https://www.theatlantic.com/education/archive/2018/04/-american-students-reading/557915/?utm_source=atlfb